2nd Amendment Letter to the Editor June 17, 2000


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While looking through an old file today, I ran across this clipping of a letter to the editor of the Marin County Independent Journal (IJ) that was published on June 17, 2000.  Thirteen years later, it would seem that little has changed.

Note in particular the final sentence of the letter.  It presages where the government would now like to go — registration of every gun in the country, so that government officials know where all guns are.  Well, I own one, obtained before changes in the law required government involvement and approval.  I remain of the opinion expressed in this letter:  Unless and until I commit a crime using one, it is none of the government’s business whether I own a gun.

Letter to the Editor, Marin Independent Journal -- June 17, 2000

Letter to the Editor, Marin Independent Journal — June 17, 2000

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Trashing the 1st Amendment in Arizona


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Right wing conservative legislators in Arizona have proposed a new law which would, in blatant violation of the 1st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, require that high school students recite an oath of allegiance as a prerequisite to graduating from high school.  The legislation would require recitation of the following oath:

“I, _______, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge these duties; So help me God.

See Note 1 below for online news articles and commentary about this proposed legislation.

“Freedom of speech” including both the freedom to speak and the freedom not to speak, any requirement that a high school student recite an oath of allegiance in order to graduate is almost certainly unconstitutional as a violation of the 1st Amendment.

More significantly, and the primary point of the controversy over the proposed legislation, is that  the requirement that students invoke “god” in the oath clearly violates the 1st Amendment’s freedom of religion clause.

As a reminder, here is what the 1st Amendment says:

          Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Proponents of this proposed oath can draw no support from the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision in Newdow v. Rio Linda Union School District, in which the phrase “under god” in the Pledge of Allegiance was upheld in a 2-1 ruling.  The majority opinion in that case, by Judge Carlos Bea, said:

          We hold that the Pledge of Allegiance does not violate the Establishment Clause because Congress’ ostensible and predominant purpose was to inspire patriotism and that the context of the Pledge—its wording as a whole, the preamble to the statute, and this nation’s history—demonstrate that it is a predominantly patriotic exercise. For these reasons, the phrase “one Nation under God” does not turn this patriotic exercise into a religious activity.

See Note 2 below for the full text of the Newdow decision.

Significantly, however, this ruling was predicated, in significant part, on the fact that the practice involved, teacher-led recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance, was required only of “willing” students.  The ruling was therefore consistent with other Circuit Court decisions upholding similar practices in Virginia and Illinois.  The statutes in each of those states allowed any student who objected to reciting the pledge to sit or stand silently.

See Note 3 below for the Virginia and Illinois cases citations.

As noted by Judge Stephen Reinhardt in his Newdow dissent, even this option should not have saved the school policy:

          Were this a case to be decided on the basis of the law or the Constitution, the outcome would be clear. Under no sound legal analysis adhering to binding Supreme Court precedent could this court uphold state-directed, teacher-led, daily recitation of the “under God” version of the Pledge of Allegiance by children in public schools. It is not the recitation of the Pledge as it long endured that is at issue here, but its recitation with the congressionally added two words, “under God”words added in 1954 for the specific religious purpose, among others, of indoctrinating public schoolchildren with a religious belief. …  Only a desire to change the rules regarding the separation of church and state or an unwillingness to place this court on the unpopular side of a highly controversial dispute regarding both patriotism and religion could explain the decision the members of the majority reach here and the lengths to which their muddled and self-contradictory decision goes in order to reach the result they do.

          To put it bluntly, no judge familiar with the history of the Pledge could in good conscience believe, as today’s majority purports to do, that the words “under God” were inserted into the Pledge for any purpose other than an explicitly and predominantly religious one: “to recognize the power and the universality of God in our pledge of allegiance;” to “acknowledge the dependence of our people, and our Government upon the moral direction and the restraints of religion,” … and to indoctrinate schoolchildren in the belief that God exists. Nor could any judge familiar with controlling Supreme Court precedent seriously deny that carrying out such an indoctrination in a public school classroom unconstitutionally forces many young children either to profess a religious belief antithetical to their personal views or to declare themselves through their silence or nonparticipation to be protesting nonbelievers, thereby subjecting themselves to hostility and ridicule.  (emphasis added and citations omitted)

In any event, it is clear that even under the rulings in Newdow, Myers & Sherman, the proposed Arizona legislation, which provides no exception for those who object to the final clause of the oath and which prevents an objector who declines to recite the oath from graduating, would be unconstitutional.

Regarding the lack of an exception for conscientious objection to the oath, one of the sponsors of the bill, freshman Republican representative and Tea Party member Bob Thorpe,  said, “In that we had a tight deadline for dropping our bills, I was not able to update the language”.  Which is all well and good, except I can’t help wondering why it is that “the language” wasn’t properly — and constitutionally — crafted in the first place.  Are representative Thorpe and his co-sponsors — Republican representatives Sonny Borrelli, Carl Seel, T.J. Shope, Jeff Dial, David Livingston, Chester Crandell and Steve Smith — all really that ignorant of the law and the constitution that they couldn’t have written this bill correctly and constitutionally in the first place?

Thorpe also said,Even though I want to encourage all of our students to understand and respect our Constitution and constitutional form of government, I do not want to create a requirement that students or parents may feel uncomfortable with.”  In that case, Mr. Thorpe, perhaps you should withdraw your ill-considered and unnecessary proposal.

Finally, as noted by Comedy Central’s Ilya Gerner, “Nothing says ‘I take this obligation freely’ quite like a state law that withholds your diploma unless you swear an oath”.  Maybe Arizonans should consider electing Gerner, who appears to have a better understanding of the law than their current representatives, to their state legislature.

See Note 4 below for Gerner’s “Comedy Central’s Indecision” blog post.

A personal aside:  I was a 9 year old elementary school student when the Pledge of Allegiance was modified on June 14, 1954, to add the words “under god”.  Although I did not speak out against the change then, as I would now, I soon after adopted the practice of omitting those words each day when we recited the pledge, and have continued doing so to this day. 

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Note 1:  For news article about this proposed legislation, see these websites:

http://current.com/groups/news-blog/94031387_arizona-bill-would-require-loyalty-oath-for-high-school-graduation.htm

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/01/26/arizona-bill-would-require-hs-students-to-swear-constitutional-oath-under-god-to-get-their-diplomas/

For a commentary about this proposed legislation from the atheist perspective, see this article on the website “Friendly Atheist”:

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2013/01/25/arizona-republicans-propose-bill-that-would-not-allow-atheists-to-graduate-high-school/

Note 2:  For the full text of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Decision in Newdow v. Rio Linda Union School District, see:

http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=11662288665673910405&hl=en&as_sdt=2&as_vis=1&oi=scholarr

Note 3:   The Virginia case referred to above is Myers v. Loudoun County Public Schools.  The full text of the opinion in this case is available here:

http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=1292322060893856606&hl=en&as_sdt=2,5&as_vis=1

The Illinois case referred to above is Sherman v. Community Consolidated School District 21 of Wheeling Township.  The full text of the opinion in this case is available here:

http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=17988630665576858060&hl=en&as_sdt=2,5&as_vis=1

Note 4:  For Ilya Gerner’s “Comedy Central’s Indecision” blog post about this proposed legislation, see:

http://www.indecisionforever.com/blog/2013/01/23/arizona-legislators-propose-loyalty-oath-for-high-school-graduation

“Lies the Government Told You”


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I just finished listening to the audio book, “Lies the Government Told You” by former New Jersey Superior Court Judge Andrew P. Napolitano and highly recommend it.  In fact, this is a book that every American should read (or listen to the audio version of).  In it, Judge Napolitano discusses the many ways in which the US federal government has deceived and continues to deceive the American People as it arrogates unto itself more and more power, diminishing in the process both individual liberties and the power of the states.

Judge Napolitano concludes his compelling discourse with a bold and detailed statement of what We The People must do to rectify this situation and reverse the federal government’s ongoing and increasing power grab.  To whet your appetite, I am going to quote the concluding paragraphs of the book in full:

We will need a major political transformation in this country to rid ourselves of persons in government who kill, lie, cheat, and steal in our names. We will need to recognize some painful truths.

First, we must acknowledge that through the actions of the government we have lost much of the freedom that we once all thought was guaranteed by the Constitution, our laws, and our values. The lost freedoms have been cataloged in this book and need not be restated here. In sum, they are the loss of the primacy of the individual’s inalienable rights and the concept that government is limited in its powers. We have lost the diffusion of power between the states and the federal government. We have lost a federal government that stays within the confines of the Constitution.

Second, we must recognize that we do not have a two-party system in this country; we have one party, the Big Government Party. There is a Republican version that assaults our civil liberties and loves deficits and war, and a Democratic version that assaults our commercial liberties and loves wealth transfers and taxes.

Third, we must acknowledge that there is a fire in the bellies of millions of young people who reject both wretched visions of the Big Government Party. These millions of young folks need either to form a Liberty Party or to build on the libertarian base in the Republican Party by banishing Big Government conservatives, neocons, and so-called social conservatives who want to use government to tell others how to live their lives back to the Democratic Party from whence they came.

Then we need a political fever that consumes the careers of all in government who voted for the Patriot Act, the illegal wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the TARP and stimulus programs, the federal takeover of education, spying on Americans without warrants, and all other unconstitutional monstrosities that have tethered lovers of liberty to Washington, D.C.

We should abolish the federal income tax, prohibit eminent domain, impose term congressional limits, make Congress part-time, return the power to elect senators to State legislatures, abolish the Federal Reserve system, and prosecute for malfeasance any member of Congress who cannot articulate where the Constitution authorizes whatever he or she is voting for or who has voted for any law that he has or she has not certified under oath that he or she read and fully understands. And we must reject the nice smiles and easy ways and seductive promises of anyone in government who lies to us.

The Big Government Party crowd is obviously not afraid of lying or being caught in a lie. Its members do not fear their own lawlessness or our loss of freedom. They only fear the loss of their own power. So let’s use that fear against them. Jefferson understood and articulated this best when he wrote: “When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. When the government fears the people, there is liberty.”

If we fear our own government, if we accept its deceptions, its lies to us, if we take no action to redress them, our freedoms are doomed.

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For Judge Napolitano’s personal website, see here:

http://www.judgenap.com/

For Judge Napolitano’s biography, see here:

http://www.judgenap.com/bio/

The “Lies the Government Told You” page of the judge’s website is here:

http://www.judgenap.com/books/lies-the-government-told-you/

Trashing the 1st & 2nd Amendments in Tennessee


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James Yeager is the owner of Tactical Response, a weapons training center in Camden, Tennessee.  His business trains people in weapons use and tactical skills — a sign on door of the business warns that the staff is trained to kill.

In response to reports that the Obama administration might take executive action to impose additional restrictions on individual rights under the 2nd Amendment, Yeager posted a You Tube video in which he said, among other things, “I’m telling you, if that happens, it’s going to spark a civil war, and I’ll be glad to fire the first shot,”

In response to Yeager’s comments — and in blatant violation of both the 1st and 2nd Amendments — the Tennessee Department of Safety & Homeland Security suspended Yeager’s carry permit.  TDS&HS Commissioner Bill Gibbons said in a news release announcing the suspension, “The number one priority for our department is to ensure the public’s safety. Mr. Yeager’s comments were irresponsible, dangerous, and deserved our immediate attention. Due to our concern, as well as that of law enforcement, his handgun permit was suspended immediately. We have notified Mr. Yeager about the suspension today via e-mail. He will receive an official notification of his suspension through the mail.”

Perhaps the “number one priority” of the TDS&HS ought to be upholding the 1st and 2nd Amendments of the US Constitution.  And perhaps Commissioner Gibbons ought to be more concerned about upholding the oath of office he took upon assuming control of his department, in which he swore to “support the constitutions of Tennessee and the United States”.

This suspension is clearly and unequivocally a violation of Yeager’s 1st Amendment right to free speech.  As decided by the United States Supreme Court in the 1965 Brandenburg v. Ohio case, the government cannot punish an individual who engages in “inflammatory speech” unless it is directed to inciting, and is likely to incite, “imminent lawless action“.

Yeager’s comments were unquestionably “inflammatory”.  Nevertheless, they are constitutionally protected against punishment by the State of Tennessee by the 1st Amendment, as applied to the states through the 14th Amendment.

In Brandenburg, a per curiam (unanimous) decision, the court said, “Freedoms of speech and press do not permit a State to forbid advocacy of the use of force or of law violation except where such advocacy is directed to inciting or producing imminent lawless action and is likely to incite or produce such action.”  (emphasis added)

Because comments were conditioned on uncertain future events (“if that happens”), they cannot be taken as “inciting or producing imminent lawless action” and cannot be “likely to incite or produce such action”.  As the Brandenburg court also noted, “The line between what is permissible and not subject to control and what may be made impermissible and subject to regulation is the line between ideas and overt acts.”  (emphasis added)

In unlawfully punishing Yeager for the exercise of his 1st Amendment rights, the state of Tennessee has also “infringed” on Yeager’s 2nd Amendment right “to keep and bear arms” — a constitutional “two fer”, if you will.

Yeager has since revised his You Tube video to remove some of the more inflammatory comments.  He is now referring all questions about the situation to his attorney and intends to pursue a legal review of his license suspension.

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The Huffington Post article about Yeager’s diatribe is here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/10/james-yeager-start-killing-people-obama-gun-policy_n_2448751.html

The MSNBC post regarding the suspension of Yeager’s handgun carry permit is here:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/50429293

The Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security website is here:

http://www.tn.gov/safety/

The Wikipedia article on Brandenburg v. Ohio (which discusses the Supreme Court 1st Amendment decisions on this issue which preceded Brandenburg) is here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brandenburg_v._Ohio

The Brandenburg decision is available on Justia.com here:

https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/395/444/case.html

Flag-Burning is Still a Crime in Texas …


… despite the famous U. S. Supreme Court decision of Texas v. Johnson, in which the court held the Texas law against flag-burning is an unconstitutional restriction on First Amendment freedom of speech.

While doing some research on Texas law for another reason today, I ran across Texas Penal Code section 42.11, which not only makes it illegal to “damage, deface, mutilate or burn” the American flag, but also the Texas state flag.

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The 1st Amendment — Dialog on Religion & Government


My recent posts here regarding Randy DeSoto’s The Conservative Voice columns were an outgrowth of an ongoing conversation among a group of West Point graduates regarding 2008 presidential election issues. John Sloan, Class of 1955, a frequent contributor to this discussion, provided a lengthy and thoughtful comment on my post on the role of religion in government, to which I will respond here.

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U.S. Supreme Court: Child Porn Purveyors Beware


The U.S. Supreme Court today warned purveyors of child pornography to beware, holding that the 2003 PROTECT Act constitutionally criminalizes promotion of such material.

In an opinion by Justice Antonin Scalia, the court held 7-2 that “offers to provide or requests to obtain” child pornography are not protected by the First Amendment, even if no actual child pornography is involved in the proposed transaction.

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